Posted in GAFE, Uncategorized

Google Forms; Basic Design (Part 1)

(Google Forms – Responses, Flubaroo, and Classroom Part 2 Blog Link)

Google Forms – Basic Design (Part 1)

 

forms2blogo
Google Forms

This year as a school we began implementing “Student Learning Objectives” as part of our curriculum.  In order to do this, we followed the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education of Missouri’s suggested “SLO – Progress – Tracker.”  In order for the tracker to be effective, teachers needed an easy way to collect quantifiable data on student performance and content knowledge.  For many teachers, the easiest way to do this on a consistent basis is Google Forms!  In part 1 of Google Forms, we are going to discuss some ideas of how to design your Google Forms to be effective in the classroom.

 

Google Forms

To access Google Forms, go to forms.google.com or go to your Drive Account (drive.google.com), click “New” – More – Google Forms.  When accessing it from forms.google.com, it will give you quick templates that could be useful to have assessments within minutes.  

The Basics About Google Forms

 

Screen Shot 2016-04-24 at 1.35.53 PM
Title

Just like every other Google Apps product, when the Google Form is first created, they are “untitled.”  Change the title to the appropriate standard or assessment (Tip: In the title include a shorten name for Formative/Summative Assessment for organizational purposes.  For Example: “FA” for Formative Assessment.)  I have attached a Google Document that goes into more detail the specific options you can do with the form, so that I can get into designing the form. (Google Forms – Cheat Sheet)

 

Design

Obviously there are a slew of ways to design your form, but the following has been wonderful for my purposes.  The first questions I always ask are First Name, Last Name, Hour, and Password.  The two names and password are setup as “short answer” and the Hour “Drop Down.”  To get the password question to work appropriately, you go to “Data Validation,” “Text,” “Contains,” enter desired password.  Tip: If “custom error text” is left then the password will be revealed to the students.  Instead, create a standard response like “Incorrect Password.”  For Example, for my American Government test on the Judicial Branch, I could use the password “Chief Justice” that students would use to access the assessment.

Screen Shot 2016-04-24 at 1.14.20 PM
Data Validation

 

 

After the sign-up page is completed, create a new “section” which are essentially pages to the form.  From this point forward, you can incorporate a variety of questions to help you assess your students content knowledge.  

Brian “Lewis” Pier suggested that in lieu of a password, create all the necessary copies of the Google Form and connect their responses to the same spreadsheet.  With the new option in Google Classroom to assign Forms to specific students, it helps prevent students from seeing the test prior to your class period.

Suggestions

  1. If you are a G Suite for Education (GAFE) school, then I would suggest setting up a short answer question that requires them to put in their school email account.  This will allow you to use Flubaroo to send students their results upon completion of their assessment.  (Google Forms – Using Flubaroo)
  2. When doing a “Matching Question” use “Multiple Choice Grid.”  I have found putting the question on the “row” portion and answers on the “column” portion it has been easiest for students to view.  Tip:  Put no more than 5 matching words-definitions per grid so that students can easily use the grid.

    1. Be sure and click “Require one response per row,” “Limit to one response per column” and “Shuffle Rows” to help deter cheating between students.Screen Shot 2016-04-24 at 1.52.15 PM
  3. Provide yourself multiple “Sections” throughout the assessment.  It helps break-up the test for students and provides opportunities for corrections on the part of the teacher.  For example, if a student notices that something is spelled wrong (which happens) students can go to a previous section while you correct the error.  Once corrected, students return to the section and it is corrected on their form.  (I generally do no more than 7 Multiple Choice Questions per page)
  4. When making these assessments, I first create it on a Google Doc.  This is handy when going to create a form, because Google Forms will automatically detect the “Enter” was used and make that into a separate “option.”  Here is a Gif demonstrating how it works:

    Tip: There is an Add-On to do the Google Form but I generally just have two windows open side-by-side between the doc and form.
  5. On a multiple choice question, I always put the correct answer as the bottom answer.  The reason is when students complete the assessment, it makes it easy to identify how the students do collectively.  Under the “Responses” tab, the form will color code each option (Gif demonstrating how it looks).  Since nearly all my multiple choice questions are four options, then the correct answer will be green (option four is green).  Definitely handy when trying to quickly determine collective student comprehension of material.

    2017-07-10_22-04-47.gif
    It is quick and easy to identify content that was not grasped by the students, which allows for re-teaching, analysis of the question/options, etc.

Any other ideas? How do you incorporate Google Forms into your classroom?  For more ideas, check out Alice Keeler’s Google Forms Section.

Also check out Google Forms – Responses, Flubaroo, and Classroom Part 2 Blog Link

Posted in GAFE

Google Forms Do More Than Just Surveys (S. Gadient)

By: Sharon Gadient – AGHS Math Teacher

Intro

It’s that time of year again — the “third quarter slump”: that time when I am desperately searching for some way to gain and hold my students’ attention long enough to stuff some knowledge in their heads. Switching up instruction is one of my tried-and-true strategies, and since I just got a working set of iPads in my classroom a few weeks ago, I was looking for a free tech tool I could use to get more interaction from my Algebra 2 students, allow for “think time” and help students self-assess. After playing with Socrative and Nearpod, I found it in a surprising place when I turned to a couple of features in Google Forms that give students real-time feedback on their guided practice problems.


What kinds of interaction does forms allow?

There are two tools that we can use for this depending on the type of question:
  1. “Go to Page Based on Answer” is an option in Multiple Choice questions that gives students different feedback depending on the answer they select, and can redirect them to try again.

  1. “Data Validation” is an option in Text responses that tells students immediately if they are wrong, will not let them proceed until they get it right, and can give students hints.
Click the link below to see a silly example quiz that demos some of the interactive things you can do with forms.

Make your own

In the video below, I walk through the process of creating interactive questions in forms.
For a text version of the directions, go to this link:

How I use it

I create a few “Guided Practice” problems that students complete as we talk through our note-taking guide, and I sometimes add in some or all of their homework assignments to be completed in forms. Students get feedback on the guided practice, right/wrong feedback on the first couple of homework problems, then they are on their own and I can have forms grade their responses automatically with the Flubaroo add-on. I also leave these forms posted in Google Classroom after the lesson for students to access any time for review.
I have found that Students are more engaged and ask more questions during the lesson than they did without using the forms. This is especially popular with my weaker math students who gain more think time and build confidence with the guided practice.

As always, playing with it gives you a better feel for the process, so tinker away — I’m sure you’ll discover things I never thought to try.

Bio:

Sharon Gadient is a Math Teacher at Ash Grove High School. This is her eighth year of teaching mathematics, and she still loves it. Sharon enjoys applied mathematics, and has a special fascination with fractals (both the pretty and the useful). Her hobbies include playing with technology, writing, and curling up on the couch with her German Shepherd to watch Dr. Who.

Twitter Account: @library_ghost